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Herald Delivered – A Bull Story in a Storm

An exciting moment has arrived for us and our fellow herd investors. Herald, our new bull, is finally delivered to T & N’s place. If you’d like to find out about the beginning of this story you can do so here and here.

It’s Thursday and there is a gale blowing, the first of many storms to come. The wind is roaring, making a constant deep rushing and rumble as it whips through the trees and around structures. By the sound, I know that a whole assortment of things will make be making a bid for freedom and I fret about slates and sheets of corrugated iron flying through the air, just waiting to decapitate the unwary. I have an unsuccessful wrestle with a tarp which has come loose, it slaps me in the face with a sharp wet sting. The deluged land is saturated and more heavy rain is predicted.

Soggy Ground www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

A cunning use of an old carpet

So why this day?

Because it is 60 days since Herald had his TB test and this is the last day that he can be moved, otherwise the process needs to be repeated again. We’re not sure how this time went by, but go by it did. There was a little hiccup with a payment going astray to a random bank account but still, where did that time go?

We climb into the landrover and make our way over to the farm where Herald is staying. The roads are littered with branches and wet leaves. In the farmhouse the farmer finishes his tea and we chat about dogs, farming and his health problems. He apologises for Herald being so mucky as all his stock is now indoors.

First T hitches the trailer on. Then we go to the big barn and the farmer finds Herald and ushers him out. He is very obedient and his expression seems to say Am I bothered?

Hereford Bull Passport www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Heralds Passport

Hitching a trailer www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Herding Cattle www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

He’s a bit mucky…

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Hereford Bull in Race www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

In the race

He had a bit of a moment in the race when he realised that something unusual was happening but settled down quickly. I missed the bit when he was being loaded as I was holding a gate to prevent him from taking a wrong turn.

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Apologies for out of focus I was trying to keep up!

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Herald and some of the new owners

He went straight into the barn and started munching some hay…until…exciting moment!

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Heralds first whiff of his new cows

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Let’s do that again

Traditional Hereford Cattle www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Hereford Bull www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Is it love?

It all went off without a hitch, much to our collective relief, and Herald seems really quiet. T has reported that he has been stroking him while eating hay so it all bodes well. His early life was amongst a small herd and the children of the family were quite used to handling him. Infact he appears to be more domesticated than Lucy, Belita or Mary-Rose…but maybe that’s becuse they are teenagers! It is said you must never trust a bull entirely so I will bear this in mind.

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25 Comments Post a comment
  1. Charlotte #

    I hope he doesn’t learn any bad habits from those flighty minxes….

    November 27, 2012
  2. heheh look at Herald in that last pic, in Nature’s thrall.

    November 27, 2012
  3. Yes do bear in mind that no bull is safe. I know somebody whose farming career ended when a docile bull turned nasty and broke her pelvis. Why are you running a bull anyway? I mean why not AI? Maybe because your cows are sucklers – obviously they’re Hereford and other beef breeds.

    November 27, 2012
    • Good question. If you read the other posts it does give some history to the decision. But in a nutshell, because AI is a bit hit and miss, (apparently more so with these traditional herefords, though can’t verify this) and expensive, and there aren’t any Traditional Hereford bulls around us. We’ve decided to see how it goes and if it doesn’t work out we’ll just sell him on – he’s only 5 so he’s got a few years in him I think. The cows in the pictures are not mine, they belong to our fellow owners.

      November 28, 2012
  4. I love these photos. They remind me of going to see the cows on my grandparents’ farm.

    November 27, 2012
    • I’m glad they’ve brought back some good memories for you.

      November 29, 2012
  5. Welcome Herald! 🙂

    November 28, 2012
  6. He has kind eyes…always good in a bull and if you were going to have a problem with him I dare say you would have seen it when you were walking behind him down the lane! Harrold most certainly appears to be appreciating his new girlfriends…fingers crossed for lots of baby harrolds (or harroldina’s) in the future 🙂

    November 28, 2012
    • Haha he did get excited for a while but soon got down to what he enjoys most – eating.

      November 29, 2012
  7. He’s a very handsome woolly bully. Handle with care. I hope he’s a Triumphant Herald.

    November 28, 2012
    • Yes, he has to deliver… we have seen his calves though…lots of them!

      November 29, 2012
  8. Very interesting. He does seem to be willing to give it a go. With luck, he’ll remain placid – but never, ever assume so!

    I’m just taken with these Herefords of yours. They’re ever so much more handsome than ours. And you know – I can’t remember the last time I saw a bull with a ring here. I wonder – is it just fashion, or are different ways of handling cattle responsible for the presence or absence of the ring?

    November 29, 2012
    • tim hutton #

      I think nose rings are still used as a precaution when bulls are shown at agricultural shows just in case they get a bit lively. Harold came from a herd where they used to show their Herefords so he was halter led as calf and the ring was just in case. I don’t think it’s ever been used – let’s hope it remains decorative – a bit of bling for the bull.

      November 29, 2012
    • They are pretty cute aren’t they? They are the older original breed – the newer style herefords are much bigger to suit modern commercial farming and they are polled. If you’re interested there’s a link in the page ‘The Herd’ to the society. I just love the family names.

      November 29, 2012
  9. Ahaa! Happy Birthday Harold! 🙂

    December 1, 2012
  10. The picture of Herald leading you along the lane is one of my favourite pictures of the year!

    I hope he realises his good fortune – all the fodder he can manage and a harem to to take care of his other ‘needs’ 😉

    BTW, I saw on his passport he was born in 07. If all goes to plan how long should he live for?

    December 1, 2012
    • Why thank you Finn…one to treasure! I’m pretty sure he’s convinced he’s worth it 🙂 Not sure how long bulls live…will do some research.

      December 1, 2012
      • Definitely. He’s a handsome lad!

        December 1, 2012
  11. The “excitement” photos were a treat! I’m always impressed at people who work with animals oh and kids – but they do make great photo opportunities 🙂

    December 1, 2012
    • I know, it was so funny when he did that 🙂 I can’t claim kinship with little L, she belongs to T & N!

      December 2, 2012

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