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Posts from the ‘Roof Mending’ Category

The Advent of Winter – Stuff on the Farm

Over the last few months I’ve been recording some of the stuff which has been going on outside. It’s a time of change and senescence, of storing and stowing.

Blackbird on Ivy www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Jackdaw in Dovecot  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Mr or Mrs Jackdaw checking out next years nesting accomodation

Wild Carrot in Winter  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Wild Carrot

Crows in Ash Tree  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Dogrose Hips  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Willow and Wild Carrot  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Dogrose Hips Sycamore Pollard  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

The cows are getting their winter coats and eating plenty of hay.

Traditional English Hereford Heifers  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Traditional English Hereford Heifers  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

The light is low and gentle.

WinterTree Shadows  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Sycamore in Winter Light  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Light Shaft in Barn  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Winter Sunset  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

It’s sometimes easy to get over attached to the indoors in winter, driving wind and rain causing mine and many a bottom to become welded to an armchair as a result. Having spent a good part of life doing an outdoor job I know that the only way to get-over-it is to get-out-in-it.

Thus today found me togged up and trowel wielding as I finally decided to plant the tulip bulbs in the tubs in the front yard. Luckily tulips are quite forgiving of procrastinating ways, people have been known to plant them in January. Gasp.

I go into the barn where I left the bulbs and all I find is a couple of empty nets. Storing and stowing. Storing and stowing. Hmm. I get on the phone and order some more.

Bulb Nets  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Luckily, there is one bag which has escaped the mouse/squirrel/rat assault so I get down to business. What is it about about preparing soil for planting? I don’t know, I just love it…I did mention to fellow blogger Fran about my cruel ways with ditching plants and I thought of her as I gaily tossed last summers pelargoniums into the death bucket (wrong colour – another procrastinating moment – leaving it so late they only had deep pink ones left at the shop. Sigh. It’s the Cornish air).

Belfast Sink with Plants  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Clearing out summer pelargoniums

This is a cunning trick which keeps the squirrels off your bulbs (if they haven’t already stolen them that is). After planting you tread the ground firmly, then get some dead leaves and scatter them over the area. This really foxes them – they look for disturbed ground and signs of digging. This method always worked for me in the city, though pots can be more vulnerable than the ground, depending on squirrel numbers and ingenuity.

Belfast Sink as Plant Container   www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.comSink

Tulips in, treading down and leaf method deployed.

Back in September when it first started to get cold I posted about wood including how much we were going to need over the winter.

Firewood Basket  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Empty Wood Pile  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

The woodpile three months on

The wind has damaged a barn, lifting old slates right off. This scaffolding tower was found dumped on the streets of London years ago and came in very handy with renovations.

Dislodged Slate on Barn  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Scaffolding tower by side of barn  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Baler Twine in Wood  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

I’m trying to think of things to do with baling twine. Any ideas?

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I did a job the other day…

In amongst moments like…

Our friend M welding the gate hinge which has been broken for years. Thank you. Hurrah.

Farm Gate Hinge www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Through the Farm Gate www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.comOur friend R bringing round some cucumbers from his polytunnel. Thank you. Yum, raita, tzatziki.

Cucumbers on Board www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Seeing for the first time the cows using their shelter. Happy.

Traditional Herefords in Shed www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Admiring the recycled rubber tyre feeders I bought from the farm shop. Threes, I love them.

Recycled Rubber Tyre Feeders  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Traditional English Herefords Feeding  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.comWondering when we’ll ever get that chestnut fencing done. One day.

Chestnut Fencing Stakes  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Feeling sorry for a grasshopper who was desperate to get warm on the front step. Life and death.

Grasshopper on Slate  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

And just revelling in this shaft of sunlight that fell on the hay. Beautiful.

Shaft of Sunlight on Hay  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

…I did actually mend the blockhouse roof. It’s called the blockhouse because it’s built from concrete blocks. There are quite a few farm buildings and a clear naming delineation is crucial – otherwise you can find yourself run ragged looking for that piece of wire mesh, remember? (no)

It’s attached to the shippen (Cornish name for a cow barn) and is really very ugly. I had plans for its demise until we realised that any dry space is essential. You’ve got to remember that we live in a place where you get a fine coating of mould on a leather bag if you leave it in the corner of a room for longer than a month or two – and that’s in the house.

Anyway, time to introduce you to Farmers Friend – tar paint. We discovered a while back that painting strips of newspaper with it and layering it like papier mache created a totally waterproof skin. This was when we were living in the bale house during renovations – a straw bale box, clad in plywood, attached to a caravan. To link the two B used this method and it was brilliant. It allowed for a bit of movement between the two structures and we only had to replenish it in one place in eight years.

The blockhouse has had some holes in the corrugated iron roof for a while but now we want to make it more watertight as we are clearing out the shippen for the cows and some of the accumulated stuff will live in here. Very excited that the shippen will be used for its traditional purpose once again.

Mending Roof with Tar Paint

All set

Mending Roof with Tar Paint

Paint area, cover with newspaper strip.

Mending Roof with Tar Paint  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Paint over with Tar Paint

Roof mended with Tar Paint and Newspaper  www.thinkingcowgirl.wordpress.com

Voila!

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